Our Mining Culture Shaped Your World

Find out how our mining culture affected different parts of the world.

Click on the map to explore the influence Cornish mining had on the entire world.

  • The Copper Triangle - Moonta Mine

    In 1859 a shepherd discovered traces of copper in South Australia’s Yorke Peninsula. This prompted a rush for mining leases. Soon after, mines had been established in Moonta, Kadina and Wallaroo. The mine in Moonta alone produced $10 million worth of copper... Find out more...

  • The Copper Triangle - Kadina Mine

    South Australia owes its global status as a copper region to Cornwall’s mining expertise. Kernewek Lowender (Cornish for ‘Cornish happiness’) is a festival held every two years in the Copper Triangle to celebrate the region’s ties to Cornwall. Find out more...

  • The Diamond Rush

    During the 1800s, Kimberly in South Africa saw the world’s greatest ever diamond rush. Hard rock mining techniques were required to extract the precious stones and so Cornish immigrants flooded in to try and make their fortune. Find out more...

  • Mexican Wave

    It was Cornish miners who introduced football to Mexico. The country’s first football club – Pachuca Athletic Club – originally comprised exclusively of Cornish mine workers. Find out more...

  • Cousin Jack's Legacy

    The expertise and innovation that the Cornish miners took with them to South Africa had a profound effect on American mining.Cornish mine workers took their traditions and pastimes with them to America, some of which are still practised in some communities today. Find out more...

  • Moor Row, Cumbria

    Moor Row on the coastal fringes of Cumbria had experienced an influx of Cornish mineworkers and their families by the 1870s and the Montreal Mines adjoining the town were eventually to produce 250,000 tons of haematite iron ore per year, the largest of any operation in the Whitehaven/Furness district. Around 1,000 workers were employed by the mines in total here and the presence of a Penzance Street in the town gives an indication of the influence of the Cornish in the latter nineteenth century.

  • Somerset

    Historic treats from Cornish mining in Somerset still exist today, at 'Burrow Farm Mine' and 'Dodington'... Find out more...

  • Mining in Wales

    Wales experienced an explosion of activity in mining for silver and copper. Find out more...

  • The Famous Laxey Wheel

    The Great Laxey Lead and Zinc Mine saw the installation of the, what would become famous, Laxey Wheel (‘Lady Isabella’) in 1854. Find out more...

  • Pasties in Michigan!

    The miners took more than just their mining knowledge to North America! Pasties are still popular fodder even after 150 years... Find out more...

  • Mining in the Rockies

    Mining in the Rockies in south western Colorado commenced in 1859 following the discovery of what became known as ‘The Gregory Lode’ by prospector John Gregory... Find out more...

  • The Richest Hill on Earth

    During the 1880s Butte had become the greatest copper producing centre in the world and was described as ‘the richest hill on earth’ by many. Find out more...

  • The USA Cornish Heritage Site

    Some of the distinctive stone cottages built by the Cornish in the mid nineteenth century have been restored as the Pendarvis Restoration. Such is the heritage value of the cottages on Shake Rag Alley that these comprise the only officially designated Cornish heritage site in the USA. Find out more...

  • Cornwall Furnace

    The Cornwall Furnace site is a unique survival in the USA of an early iron ore smelter dating from around 1856 Established by Peter Grubb in 1742. Find out more...

  • The Californian Gold Rush

    Grass Valley came to prominence in 1850 following the discovery of gold along what would be known as Gold Hill. This would mark the start of deep hard-rock mining in the area which required a skill that the Cornish were well placed to supply.  Find out more...

  • The Invincible Mine...

    From its origins in the late 1870s Waihi was to grow to become one of the world’s most important gold mining centres...

Australia

Australia

Our heritage - your bling

They didn't beat around the bush...

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Tin did because tin can...

Tin did because tin can...

Our heritage - your bling

Food stored for ages used to be lethal. Our thin tin coating changed canned food forever.

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